Category Archives: Audio/Video/Music

Multi-media.

Gambia: The Formidable Baye Janha – An Incredible Guitar Legend

An African man playing the xalam.

Baye Janha plays the guitar like the ancient Khalam of the Wolof tribe of the Senegambia region and the Ganawa south Moroccan sound to a mass effect with his guitar. He was the band leader of the Gelewarr band, the Super Alligators, Fabulous Eagles, Supreme Eagles, Tambato band, the Karantaba band and Ifang Bondi. His playing technique can be distinctly heard on the SARABA CD/ALBUM recorded in Senegal on Griot records. He was awarded a medal in Algeria as one of Africa’s top guitarists with his solo group The Karantaba Band.

Full story: http://allafrica.com/stories/201207130531.html

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Baay Bia – Liy Am Amna [Official Video w/Subtitles]

World-renowned Senegalese griot, singer, poet and emcee Baay Bia linked up with Nomadic Wax in 2007 on his first trip to the United States. Since then, he has toured with the Nomadic Wax ‘African Underground All Stars’ on numerous occasions. Baay Bia is a unique emcee who combines the traditional musical sounds of Senegal with contemporary hip hop and reggae. He rhymes and sings in Wolof and was born into a griot family, a lineage that has a major influence over his music and his sound. In July of 2009, Baay Bia worked together with Nomadic Wax filmmaker Magee McIlvaine (co-director of ‘Democracy in Dakar’) to put together a music video for ‘Liy Am Amna,’ one of Baay Bia’s most popular songs in Senegal.

Basic Wolof Phrases

See original list here: Some Essential Wolof Phrases
For help with pronunciation see: Pronunciation Guide


↓ scroll down for more resources ↓


Essentials | sólo

English
Wolof / Français
pro·nun·ci·a·tion
[Pulaar / Mandinka]

 

Hello.
Salaam aleekum. / Bonjour.
sa·laam a·ley·kum / bon·zhoor
[P: No ngoolu daa. / M: I be ñaading.]

Goodbye.
Mangi dem. / Au revoir.
maan·gee dem / o·rer·vwar
[P: Ñalleen e jamm. / M: Fo tuma doo.]

Please.
Bu la neexee. / S’il vous plaît.
boo la ney·khey / seel voo pley
[P: Njaafodaa. / M: Dukare.]

Thank you.
Jërejëf. / Merci.
je·re·jef / mair·see
[P: A jaaraamah. / M: I ning bara.]

You’re welcome.
Amul sólo. / Je vous en prie.
uh·mool so·lo / zher voo zom pree
[P: Enen ndendidum. / M: Mbee le dentaala.]

Yes.
Waaw. / Oui.
wow / wee
[P: Eey. / M: Haa.]

No.
Déedéet. / Non.
dey·deyt / non
[P: Alaa. / M: Hani.]

Sorry. (Excuse me.)
Baal ma. (Jéggël ma.) / Pardon. (Excusez-moi.)
baal ma (jey·guhl mah) / par·don (ek·skew·zay·mwa)
[P: Achanam hakke. (Yaafo.) / M: Hakko tuñe.]

Do you speak English?
Ndax dégg nga angale? / Parlez-vous anglais?
ndakh deg nguh an·ga·ley / par·ley·voo ong·ley
[P: Ada faama engale? / M: Ye angkale kango moyle?]

Do you understand? (Do you speak … ?)
Dégg nga? / Comprenez-vous?
deg nguh / kom·pre·ney·voo
[P: (Ada nana … ?) / M: (Ye … kango moyle?)]

I understand.
Dégg naa. / Je comprends.
deg na / zher kom·pron
[P: Mi faami. / M: Ngaa kalamuta le.]

I don’t understand.
Dégguma. / Je ne comprends pas.
deg·goo·ma / zher ner kom·pron pa
[P: Mi faamaani / M: Mma kalamuta.]

Help!
Wóoy! / Au secours!
wohy / o·skoor
[P: Ballal! / M: Nso orangzola!]

Continue reading Basic Wolof Phrases

Traduction En Wolof

Wolof audio translation of an Islamic speech.

AUDIOS – Traduction en Wolof du « Wassilatoul Mouna ou Tayssir » de Seydil Hadj Malick SY

AUDIOS - Traduction en Wolof du « Wassilatoul Mouna ou Tayssir » de Seydil Hadj Malick SY
AUDIOS – Traduction en Wolof du « Wassilatoul Mouna ou Tayssir » de Seydil Hadj Malick SY

http://www.asfiyahi.org/AUDIOS-Traduction-en-Wolof-du-Wassilatoul-Mouna-ou-Tayssir-de-Seydil-Hadj-Malick-SY_a756.html

World Bank IDA – Senegal: Nutrition and Education

• 84 percent gross primary school enrollment rate in 2008, up from 67 percent in 2002
• 24 percent of children under age five reached by an integrated package of community nutrition activities

The International Develepment Association, IDA, is the World Bank’s Fund for the Poorest. One of the world’s largest sources of aid, IDA provides support for health and education, infrastructure and agriculture, and economic and institutional development to the 79 poorest countries – 39 of them in Africa. These countries are home to 2.5 billion people, 1.5 billion of whom survive on $2 a day or less.

http://www.worldbank.org/ida

Senegalese Wrestling

Laamb – la lutte sénégalaise

Pro Wrestling, Senegal Style
Pro Wrestling, Senegal Style

Pro Wrestling, Senegal Style – NYTimes.com

Senegalese wrestling
Senegalese wrestling match at the stade Demba Diop in Dakar.

Senegalese wrestling (fr. Lutte sénégalaiseNjom in Serer languageLaamb in Wolof) is a type of Folk wrestling traditionally performed by the Serer people and now a national sport in Senegal and parts of The Gambia, and is part of a larger West African form of traditional wrestling (fr. Lutte Traditionnelle). The Senegalese form traditionally allows blows with the hands (frappe), the only of the West African traditions to do so. As a larger confederation and championship around Lutte Traditionnelle has developed since the 1990s, Senegalese fighters now practice both forms, called officially Lutte Traditionnelle sans frappe (for the international version) and Lutte Traditionnelle avec frappe for the striking version. Senegalese wrestling – Wikipedia

Laamb glossary:

laamb – traditional Senegalese wrestling. Laamb is the Wolof word for wrestling which is borrowed from Serer Fara-Lamb Siin (Fara of Mandinka origin whilst Lamb of Serer origin) the chief griot who used to beat the tam-tam of Sine called Lamb or Laamb in Serer. The lamb was part of the music accompaniment of wrestling in pre-colonial times as well as after Senegal’s independence. The Serer word for wrestling is njom which derives from the Serer word jom (heart or honour). In French it is called Lutte sénégalaise. 

gris-gris (pronounced gree-gree) – also spelled grigri, is a voodoo amulet originating in Africa which is believed to protect the wearer from evil or brings luck, and in some West African countries is used as a method of birth control. It consists of a small cloth bag, usually inscribed with verses from the Qur’an and containing a ritual number of small objects, worn on the person. Although the exact origins of the word are unknown, some historians trace the word back to the African word juju meaning fetish. An alternative theory is that the word originates with the French joujou meaning doll or play-thing.

mbër – Laamb wrestler.

bàkk – a type of dance performed before a match. (not sure if this is something that is still done or something that was done before it became a national sport)

More YouTube – Senegalese wrestling videos

Wolof Video w/English Subs – XALA

Xala

It is the dawn of Senegal’s independence from France, and as Dakar citizens celebrate in the streets we soon become aware that only faces have changed in the handover of power. White money still controls the government.

Film en langue Wolof (English subtitles) avec Kadi Jolie

CONSEILS D’UNE TANTE

A film in the Wolof language. With good humor, an aunt gives her teenage niece heart advice on men and their predatory instincts … Idea: Aram Dieye, 16 (Senegal) / Directed by: Idrissa Ouedraogo (Burkina Faso). A film collection SCENARIOS dAfric (www.globaldialogues.org). Wolof with English subtitles version.

Wolof Question Words w/Audio Pronunciation

 

Wolof / English / French 


Kan?   Who?   Qui?
Lan?   What?   Quoi?
Ban?   Which?   Quel?
Nan? Naka?   How?   Comment?
Ñaata?   How much?   Combien?
Fan? Ana?   Where?   ?
Kañ?   When?   Quand?
Mbaa…?   …?   Estce que…?
Lutax?   Why?   Pourquoi?
Mootax, Ndaxte…   Because…   Parce que

 

I got busted for not giving credit to the YouTuber’s whose videos I post (my bad, I thought since the videos are basically links that it’s all good?) So to be a good citizen of the blogosphere and of the Internet at large I will do my civic duty and give credit to Languages1001 for posting this on YouTube.

 

Senegal Independence Day

Senegal gained partial independence from France today in 1960 with complete independence achieved upon the dissolution of the Mali Federation on August 20th of the same year.

Brief video of Independence Day in Senegal…

Happy Tabaski

Today is the Muslim holiday Tabaski. In most Muslim countries it is called Eid al-Adha but in much of West Africa it is called Tabaski. Tabaski is the commemoration of the Biblical patriarch Abraham’s (Ibrahim in Arabic) willingness to sacrifice his son as commanded by God. On Tabaski a sheep (or a goat) is slaughtered as a symbolic gesture of the ram that God substituted for Abraham’s son.

Youssou N’dour & Super Etoile performing “Tabaski” in the studio.

Below is a slide show of a Tabaski preparation and celebration in Dakar, Senegal (warning: a few of the pictures are of the slaughter so if you are squeamish to that sort of thing be aware!)

La League DJ Décalé Wolof

La League DJ Décalé Wolof

I do not know where this video is from but Décalé is very popular in the Ivory Coast which I have recently learned has a sizable Wolof population. At about position 1:20 in the video they do a call and response where the Wolof is very clear and easy to catch…much of what they say at this part we have already covered in this blog…test yourself and see if you understand what they are saying!